Asthma & COPD

Better Education, Better Breathing
f
TAGS
H

Just call us the asthma-myth busters!

We thought we would de-bunk a few myths that we've come across during our time working in the respiratory-world.

So here is myth #1...

The truth is that asthma medications do NOT become less effective over time. If you're taking your preventative inhalers as prescribed (the right dose, at the right time), then this will help to keep them effective! If you find you are becoming increasingly reliant on your symptom reliever inhaler, and it isn't working quite as well as it once did, this is most likely because the inflammation inside your airways is worsening, and you need to consider starting on a preventative inhaler. If this applies to you - keep a record of your symptoms, your reliever inhaler use, and show this to your GP for a medication review!

(Source: Harris, R., Everyday Health, 2015)

Myth #2...

Anyone with asthma should aim to be able to function as normal in their daily lives. This is why we use preventative medications and symptom relievers... so that we can effectively manage our asthma and still go about our lives as usual!

Did you know that physical activity increases lung resilience? This means that physical activity can actually HELP with asthma! The barrier we face is gaining enough control over asthma so that we can allow ourselves to engage in sports and exercise. So if you feel that this is something you haven't quite achieved yet - talk to your GP about your current medications and asthma management regime and how this can be improved.

(Source: Harris, R., Everyday Health, 2015)

Myth #3...

This is something I often hear as a Respiratory Nurse! However, the truth is, you can't actually out grow asthma!

Asthma is a lifelong condition, but it is possible to become 'asymptomatic'. This means that symptoms of asthma can become intermittent or disappear over time. Reasons for this are largely unknown, but are thought to be attributed to environmental factors and changes in the body as we age.

(Source: Harris, R., Everyday Health, 2015)


By Elyse, Respiratory Nurse Educator



 

This product has been added to your cart

CHECKOUT